Nonfiction November: New to My TBR

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Nonfiction November 2020 wraps up with the 4th week, which I’m kind of stretching into a 5th, hosted by Katie @ Doing Dewey. And the prompt is:

It’s been a month full of amazing nonfiction books! Which ones have made it onto your TBR? Be sure to link back to the original blogger who posted about that book!

So many blogs, so many books! There’s enough to keep me reading well into next November, so I’ll just highlight a few that especially sparked my interest.

A History of Future Cities by Daniel Brook (Katie @ Doing Dewey) a study of four cities around the world that have tried to leap forward by emulating the West.  

How to Kill A City: Gentrification, Inequality and the Fight for the Neighborhood by Peter Moskowitz (Eva @ The Paperback Princess) sounds like a strong critique of gentrification and its impact on cities and neighborhoods.

Into Thin Air by John Krakauer (Athira @ Reading on a Rainy Day) a classic story about a disastrous climb up Mount Everest.

Pleased to Meet Me: Genes, Germs and the Curious Forces That Make Us Who We Are by Bill Sullivan (Rennie @ What’s Nonfiction) about the influence of genes and epigenetics on who we are and how we behave.

Rewilding: The Radical New Science of Ecological Recovery by Paul Jepson & Cain Blyth (Liz @ librofulltime). Can we help restore the environment by making it wild again?

This was my first time participating in Nonfiction November.  It’s been a lot of fun and a real motivator to get me posting a little more frequently than I normally do.  Plus I’ve discovered lots of new blogs, and tons of new books. Thanks to all of you.

Special thanks to Katie, Rennie, Julie and Leann for organizing and hosting the event!

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4 Responses to Nonfiction November: New to My TBR

  1. Great additions, I hope you have the opportunity to enjoy them!

    Like

  2. Liz Dexter says:

    Lovely additions to your list and I’m glad one of mine piqued your interest!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. DoingDewey says:

    Oh yay! Excited to see A History of Future Cities on your list. I also added How To Kill a City to my list, which appealed to me for a lot of the same reasons as the books I read on urban planning 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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