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Nonfiction November 2022 Week 5: New to My TBR

It’s been a wonderful month of sharing and celebrating with nonfiction bloggers! Now it’s time to wrap it all up with Jaymi @ The OC BookGirl hosting this final week. “It’s been a month full of amazing nonfiction books! Which ones have made it onto your TBR? Be sure to…

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The Book of Roads and Kingdoms

The Book of Roads and Kingdoms was a total impulse buy. On a recent vacation to Australia, I saw it prominently displayed in a Dymocks book shop. I’d never heard of the author and it’s about a topic I know almost nothing about, but I’ve always been intrigued by geography…

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Nonfiction November 2022 Week 4: Worldview Changers

Wow, it’s already Week 4 of Nonfiction November! Our host this week is Rebekah @ She Seeks Nonfiction and the topic is Worldview Changers: “One of the greatest things about reading nonfiction is learning all kinds of things about our world which you never would have known without it. There’s…

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Nonfiction November 2022 Week 3: Stranger Than Fiction

Welcome to Week 3 of Nonfiction November hosted by Christopher @ Plucked From The Stacks. The topic this week is Stranger Than Fiction: “This week we’re focusing on all the great nonfiction books that *almost* don’t seem real. A sports biography involving overcoming massive obstacles, a profile on a bizarre…

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Nonfiction November 2022 Week 2: Book Pairings

It’s Week 2 of Nonfiction November and the theme is Book Pairings hosted by Rennie @ What’s Nonfiction. “This week, pair up a nonfiction book with a fiction title (or another nonfiction!). It can be a “If you loved this book, read this!” or just two titles that you think…

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Nonfiction November 2022 Week 1: Your Year in Nonfiction

I’m excited to participate once again in Nonfiction November, an annual celebration of and by nonfiction book bloggers. This is my 3rd Nonfiction November and it’s starting to become a highlight of the year for me. I’m looking froward to making new connections with nonfiction bloggers and renewing old ones,…

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Bewilderment

In Richard Powers’ latest novel, Bewilderment, astrobiologist Theo Byrne is a single father struggling to raise his nine-year-old son Robin. Robin himself struggles with emotional turmoil for which there’s no clear diagnosis. “So far the votes are two Asperger’s, one probable OCD, and one possible ADHD … Half the third-graders in…

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Ever Green

Forests are special places. Walking through a forest — I don’t do this often enough — makes me feel calmer and more alive at the same time. My senses seem more alert or maybe more receptive. And I know they’re special not just for the personal experiences they offer. They…

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What We Owe The Future

“Future people count. There could be a lot of them. We can make their lives go better.” That’s the central idea of What We Owe The Future, a provocative book by William MacAskill who’s an associate professor of philosophy at the University of Oxford. Even if you disagree with some…

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Life Is Simple

Ever heard of Occam’s razor? It’s the principle that says the simplest explanation that fits the facts is most likely the correct one. It’s formally stated as “entities should not be multiplied without necessity.” Or informally as “keep it simple, stupid.” Occam’s razor is named after William of Occam (sometimes…

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The Last White Man

One morning in an unnamed city in an unnamed country, a white man named Anders wakes up to discover that his skin has turned dark brown. His facial features have changed too. He doesn’t recognize himself in the mirror.   Anders isn’t the only one. Gradually, every white person in…

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The Ministry for the Future

It’s the year 2024. After most nations fail to meet their commitments under the Paris Climate Agreement, delegates to the annual Conference of the Parties (COP) create a “subsidiary body” to defend and protect future generations of citizens and all living creatures, present and future, who cannot speak for themselves.…

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Allow Me to Retort

Elie Mystal thinks the US Constitution is trash. In Allow Me to Retort: A Black Guy’s Guide to the Constitution he makes a solid case.  Mystal is justice correspondent for The Nation and a graduate of Harvard Law School. Allow Me to Retort: A Black Guy’s Guide to the ConstitutionBy…

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How Rights Went Wrong

How did you feel on June 24, 2022, when the US Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade and struck down the constitutionally protected right to abortion? Did you feel victorious? Elated? Vindicated? Did you feel that a terrible injustice had been corrected? That the Court had at long last recognized…

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A World on the Wing

I’ve been reading some pretty heavy stuff lately; books about the rise of tyranny around the world and some godawful decisions coming out of the US Supreme Court. I needed to take a break, read something a little more uplifting. And what could be more uplifting than a book about…

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West Virginia v. EPA: Major Questions, Major Troubles

Just one week after striking down the right to abortion in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, the US Supreme Court has now severely restricted the government’s ability to fight climate change. I think the Court’s decision in West Virginia v. EPA is deeply troubling for at least three reasons:…

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The Road to Unfreedom

I read widely and I follow news and politics closely, but in recent years I’ve often felt utterly baffled by world events. It’s like I’m trying to put together a jigsaw puzzle without the picture on the box. I manage to build up a few disconnected fragments here and there,…

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How the World Really Works

Global climate change is an unprecedented challenge for the world.  To meet the challenge, we need to make unprecedented changes in the ways we live, work, produce, and consume.   In a new book called How the World Really Works: The Science Behind How We Got Here and Where We’re…

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The Advice Trap

The Advice Trap: Be Humble, Stay Curious & Change the Way You Lead Forever could easily be boiled down to three or four PowerPoint slides. In fact, I suspect the book originated as three or four PowerPoint slides that were puffed up and padded out into a full-length book.  …

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Friends

Ever heard of Robin Dunbar? He’s the guy who famously discovered Dunbar’s Number: 150. Wait, let me clarify that. Robin Dunbar did not discover the number 150. What he did discover is that 150 is roughly the largest number of friendships most of us can maintain at one time. Robin…

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Nothing Is True and Everything Is Possible

On the surface, Nothing Is True and Everything Is Possible: The Surreal Heart of the New Russia is a memoir of the years 2001 to 2010 when the author, Peter Pomerantsev, lived and worked in Russia.  In reality, the book is an in-depth critique – no that’s not strong enough…

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Greenwood

I was on vacation last week and took one of my periodic side trips into fiction. Greenwood, by Canadian writer Michael Christie, is a novel about family and trees and the relationship between them. It spans four generations of the Greenwood family over the course of about 130 years. A…

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On Tyranny

I’ve lived my whole life in democratic countries. I’ve never experienced what it’s like to live under a dictatorship, thankfully. But these days, I’m worried. Democracy here in the US and around the world seems more fragile that it used to, or maybe I’m just more aware of its fragility.…

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The Economic Weapon

This book could not be more timely. Published one month before Vladimir Putin’s invasion of Ukraine, The Economic Weapon: The Rise of Sanctions as a Tool of Modern War is about the origins, evolution and uses of economic sanctions during the years between the two world wars. It’s written by…

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